MECH 513: Smart Materials and Intelligent Structural Systems
MECH 513: Smart Materials and Intelligent Structural Systems
Proc IMechE Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering .. special issue on smart materials (2007)

Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, 2007, Volume 221 Number 4.
From the guest editorial " It is hoped that the reviews presented in this Special Issue will provide the readership of the Journal of Aerospace Engineering with a general appreciation of a category of materials and systems that is referred to as smart materials".

Individual papers are available via e-Library and/or MetaLib.

 

Martinez-Val, Rodrigo. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, pi-i, 1p;
Abstract: The author reflects on his new role as editor-in-chief for the periodical "Journal of Aerospace Engineering." He expressed excitement to his new position and examined several functions he will be performing. He likewise dismissed the idea of pressuring academic staff and researchers to increase the quantity of publications. Meanwhile, he thanks the motivated participation of his colleagues for the publication of the periodical.; (AN 26355151)

PDF Full Text(18K)2.

 

Fernando, Gerard F., Guest Editorial. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, piii-v, 3p, 2 diagrams;
Abstract: The article discusses various reports published within the issue, including one by P. A. Lloyd on the general overview of some key technologies and another by Michael Kessler on the technical review of the classification of materials that have some self-healing form capacity.; (AN 26355160). PDF Full Text(252K).

 

Lloyd, P. A., Requirements for smart materials. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p417-478, 62p, 2 diagrams, 2bw;
Abstract: Smart materials obtain their unique properties by the deliberate introduction of multi-functionality. This can enable the material, or the structure from which it is made, to diagnose its condition or environment, change shape, self-repair, or other functions as developing technology allows. It is argued that any of these functions are only viable if both the costs and benefits are considered on a system-wide basis. Some of the particular requirements and challenges for a number of example applications are considered and some general requirements suggested. It is concluded that such system-wide approach to optimization is a challenge for both designers and for those developing smart materials but it is necessary if the full advantages of smart materials are to be realized. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355159); PDF Full Text(290K)3.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO184

 

Kessler, M. R., Self-healing: a new paradigm in materials design. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p479-495, 17p, 7 diagrams;
Abstract: Self-healing materials, when damaged, are designed to sense the failure and respond in an autonomous fashion to restore structural function. Inspired by biological systems, synthetic self-healing materials represent a new paradigm in the design of polymer based composites. This overview article summarizes the different strategies and approaches to achieving self-healing functionality and discusses future directions in the nascent field. The strategies are broadly classified into the following three categories: healing with an embedded liquid phase repair agent, thermally activated solid phase healing, and healing of projectile puncture. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355153); PDF Full Text(451K)4.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO172

 

Takeda, N.; Okabe, Y.; Mizutani, T.. Damage detection in composites using optical fibre sensors.
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p497-508, 12p, 11 diagrams, 4 graphs;
Abstract: Optical fibre sensors (OFSs) are promising as tools for damage and structural health monitoring (SHM) of aerospace composite structures. Hence, many researchers have conceived various kinds of OFSs. First, a brief summary of OFSs used for composites is presented. Then, the authors' studies on the small-diameter fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for damage monitoring and SHM of composite structures are described. The authors and Hitachi Cable, Ltd have developed a small-diameter optical fibre and its FBG sensor for embedment inside a lamina of composite laminates without strength reduction. Then, some recent results in the current Structural Integrity Diagnosis and Evaluation of Advanced Composite Structures (ACS-SIDE) project are presented on optical fibre-based SHM for some feasible applications in aerospace composite structures. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355150); PDF Full Text(1.1MB)5.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO148

 

Chung, D. D. L., Damage detection using self-sensing concepts. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p509-520, 12p, 1 diagram, 8 graphs;
Abstract: Self-sensing refers to the structural material sensing itself. Real-time self-sensing of damage in carbon fibre polymer-matrix composites by electrical resistance measurement is reviewed. The resistance changes irreversibly upon damage, as shown for damage inflicted by flexure, tension, fatigue, and impact. Delamination increases the through-thickness resistance. Fibre breakage increases the longitudinal resistance. The oblique resistance, as measured at an angle between the longitudinal and through-thickness directions, is particularly sensitive. Minor flexural damage causes the oblique resistance in the unloaded state to decrease. Current spreading enables the sensing of localized damage by measurement away from the damage, though it reduces the spatial resolution of the sensing. The resistance method is more sensitive than the potential method. Two-dimensional sensing is complicated by the anisotropic spreading of the current. Thermal damage and through-thickness (fastening) compression effect are indicated by the contact resistivity of the interlaminar interface. The through-thickness compression effect is alternately indicated by the longitudinal volume resistivity. The condition of a composite fastening joint is indicated by the contact resistivity of the joint interface. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355156); PDF Full Text(312K)6.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO203

 

Garden, L. H.; Hayward, D.; Pethrick, R. A., Dielectric non-destructive testing approach to cure monitoring of adhesives and composites. 
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p521-533, 13p, 1 chart, 4 diagrams, 5 graphs;
Abstract: In the fabrication of many composite and adhesively bonded structures it is desirable to determine the extent to which complete cure is achieved. This review briefly discusses the fundamental issues which are involved in the monitoring of the cure process in thermoset resins. The application of the dielectric method is described as a non-destructive probe for the monitor of the cure process in thermoset resin systems. The principles of the technique are illustrated with reference to a simple epoxy-amine structural adhesive. Possible correlations between the changes in the dielectric properties with other physical property changes of a resin, e.g. viscosity, during cure are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355157); PDF Full Text(740K)7.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO158

 

Hartl, D. J.; Lagoudas, D. C., Aerospace applications of shape memory alloys.
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p535-552, 18p, 1 chart, 6 diagrams, 7 graphs;
Abstract: With the increased emphasis on both reliability and multi-functionality in the aerospace industry, active materials are fast becoming an enabling technology capturing the attention of an increasing number of engineers and scientists worldwide. This article reviews the class of active materials known as shape memory alloys (SMAs), especially as used in aerospace applications. To begin, a general overview of SMAs is provided. Their useful properties and engineering effects are described and the methods in which these may be utilized are discussed. A review of past and present aerospace applications is presented. The discussion addresses applications for both atmospheric earth flight as well as space flight. To complete the discussion, SMA design challenges and methodologies are addressed and the future of the field is examined. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355154); PDF Full Text(680K)8.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO211

 

Bar-Cohen, Y., Electroactive polymers as an enabling materials technology.
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p553-564, 12p, 2 charts, 5 diagrams, 7bw;
Abstract: Natural muscles are the actuators in most of the biological systems that are larger than a bacterium. The drive mechanism of muscles is complex, and they are capable of lifting large loads with short time response in the range of milliseconds. Electroactive polymers (EAPs) are human-made actuators that most closely emulate biological muscles, and therefore they earned the moniker ‘artificial muscles’. Initially, EAPs received relatively little attention because of their limited actuation capability. In the last 15 years, a series of EAP materials have emerged that exhibit a significant shape change in response to electrical stimulation. Using these materials as actuators, various novel mechanisms and devices were already demonstrated, including robot fish, catheter steering element, miniature gripper, loudspeaker, active diaphragm, and dust wiper. The impressive advances in improving their actuation strain capability are attracting the attention of engineers and scientists from many different disciplines. These materials are particularly attractive to biomimetic applications, because they can be used to make biologically inspired intelligent robots and other mechanisms. Increasingly, engineers are able to develop EAP-actuated mechanisms that were previously considered science fiction. This article reviews the state-of-the-art challenges and potential applications of EAP materials. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355155)

PDF Full Text(522K)9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO141

 

Alderson, A.; Alderson, K. L., Auxetic materials. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p565-575, 11p, 10 diagrams, 1 graph;
Abstract: The current status of research into auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) materials is reviewed, with particular focus on those aspects of relevance to aerospace engineering. Developments in the modelling, design, manufacturing, testing, and potential applications of auxetic cellular solids, polymers, composites, and sensor/actuator devices are presented. Auxetic cellular solids in the forms of honeycombs and foams are reviewed in terms of their potential in a diverse range of applications, including as core materials in curved sandwich panel composite components, radome applications, directional pass band filters, adaptive and deployable structures, MEMS devices, filters and sieves, seat cushion material, energy absorption components, viscoelastic damping materials, and fastening devices. The review of auxetic polymers includes the fabrication and characterization of microporous polymer solid rods, fibres, and films, as well as progress towards the first synthetic molecular-level auxetic polymer. Potential auxetic polymer applications include self-locking reinforcing fibres in composites, controlled release media, and self-healing films. Auxetic composite laminates and composites containing auxetic constituents are reviewed and enhancements in fracture toughness, and static and low velocity impact performance are presented to demonstrate potential in energy absorber components. Finally, the potential of auxetics as strain amplifiers, piezoelectric devices, and structural health monitoring components is presented. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355152) PDF Full Text(508K)10.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO185

 

Akhavan, J., Electro-rheological polymers. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p577-587, 11p, 3 charts, 1 diagram;
Abstract: Smart fluids in the form of electro-rheological (ER) fluids are among the most spectacular of the smart materials. ER fluids are typically suspensions of semiconducting, solid particles dispersed in an insulating carrier liquid, which show a dramatic increase in flow resistance when an external electric field is applied. This reversible and rapid change in flow properties has potential applications in many electronically controlled mechanical devices. This article gives a short overview of the field of ER materials and their basic properties. Current and future developments with particular attention to electrorheological polymers have been reviewed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 26355149)

PDF Full Text(262K)11.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO142;

 

Diegoli, S.; Hamlett, C. A. E; Leigh, S. J.; Mendes, P. M.; Preece, J. A., Engineering nanostructures at surfaces using nanolithography. 
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G: Journal of Aerospace Engineering, August 2007, Vol. 221 Issue 4, p589-629, 41p, 32 diagrams, 2 graphs;
Abstract: In just a few years, exploring nanostructured materials has become a new theme common to many disciplines of science and engineering. Recent surge of interest in these nanostructured systems stems from the remarkable effects that may arise from the critical size reduction. Structured materials on the nanometre scale can lead to improved and sometimes novel properties with emerging applications ranging from novel highly functional devices to advanced chemical and biological sensors. Significant advances made in nanomaterials research, together with improved lithographic fabrication strategies have led to dramatic enhancements in the creation of complex and well-defined nanostructures on surfaces. This article reviews the status of research and development in nanostructured materials, with particular focus on the recent advances on nanolithographic techniques. Finally, perspectives and future challenges in this emerging field of research are also discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 26355158); PDF Full Text(2.2MB)12. http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544100JAERO212


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Created by John Summerscales on 23 October 2007. Terms and conditions. Errors and omissions. Corrections.
Advanced Composites Manufacturing Centre
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